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Graduate Manual

Degree Requirements

First Term Considerations

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Applied Placement Level

Applied placement auditions are held individually before a faculty committee in the student’s performance area and are designed to evaluate the student’s performance ability. Guidelines may vary from area to area, but typically all incoming graduate students in our Master of Arts degree programs (with the exception of Arts Administration) who have not auditioned for the College of Music are required to audition for placement purposes (see Examination: Graduate Music Classification). Performance majors who have previously been accepted via a recorded audition are required to reaffirm that placement by a live audition at the time they enter the College of Music. An applied placement audition is not required for Arts Administration, Musicology, Composition, Music Therapy, Music Education, and Theory students. The audition requirements for each area and degree program are listed in the College of Music Bulletin or can be obtained from the Graduate Music Office (or online at https://music.fsu.edu/). As a result of the audition, students can qualify for the performance levels defined below:

MASTER OF ARTS DEGREES
MVO 5050 MM (non-performance majors) and MME students who have not passed auditions for MV_ 5351-6 are sometimes placed in this holding number until they do so. Credit earned in MVO 5050 cannot be applied toward a degree program.
MV_ 5351-6 Principal level for MM non-performance and MME majors.
MM PERFORMANCE
MVO 5055 All MM Performance majors who have not passed auditions for MV_ 5451-6 are placed in this holding number until they do so. Credit earned in MVO 5055 cannot be applied toward a degree program.*
MV_ 5451-6 Performance level for MM Performance majors.
MVK 5681 Performance level for MM Piano Pedagogy majors.
MVK 5730 Performance level for MM Vocal Accompanying majors.
MVK 5731 Performance level for MM Instrumental Accompanying majors.

Additional auditions for voice performance majors: Students in the MM program in voice performance must perform an additional audition to be admitted to Recital Coaching, preparatory to the master’s degree recital (see Special Policies: Voice).

DM PERFORMANCE
MVO 6065 All DM Performance majors who have not yet passed the diagnostic exam for MV_ 6461-6 are placed in this holding number until they do so. Credit earned in MVO 6065 cannot be applied toward a degree program.*/**
MV_ 6461-6 Performance Level for DM Performance majors. Must pass the diagnostic exam for this level.
SECONDARY INSTRUMENT
MV_ 5251-6 Secondary Instrument/Voice level for all Master’s level students. An audition is not necessary. Credit can apply toward degree but not as principal instrument, unless the student passes the principal instrument audition.
MV_ 6261-6 Secondary Instrument/Voice level for all Doctoral level students. An audition is not necessary. Credit can apply toward degree but not as principal instrument, unless the student passes the principal instrument audition.

* Students may enroll at this level for only one semester. Exceptions must be approved by the applied teacher and the area coordinator.

** With the approval of the area faculty and Director of Graduate Studies in Music, MVO 6065 may be converted to MV_ 6461-6 in the semester in which the diagnostic exam is passed, if this can be accomplished prior to the issuance of grade rosters from the University Registrar’s office (approximately one week before the last day of classes). It is not possible to convert MVO 6065 to MV_ 6461-6 during the last week of classes or after the semester in which the diagnostic is passed.

Graduate Music Classification Proficiency Examinations

Note: All incoming graduate music students must take the graduate music classification examinations at the beginning of their first semester and must complete all requirements as diagnosed by the exams before they are eligible to graduate. Also, students must remediate any deficiencies in history and theory prior to registering for graduate history or theory courses.

The Graduate Music Classification Examination (GMCE) is a series of proficiency tests administered prior to the beginning of each semester to all graduate students who are entering the College of Music for the first time (including undergraduates of FSU). The GMCE includes areas of music skills covered in a typical four-year program of undergraduate music study.

Students deficient in any of the areas below will be required to register for certain remedial courses. Graduate courses taken for remedial purposes are not credited toward the total hours required for any graduate degree.

As an aid in counseling, the following guidelines are provided for the GMCE’s areas:

Theory Examination (Required of all students, except those in the Music Therapy degree program.)
This examination covers subjects from the first two years of college theory, including sections on realization of figured bass, harmonic analysis, seventh chords, basic strict counterpoint, and formal analysis. All students must pass the theory test or take MUT 5051, Graduate Theory Review. Students may take the exam multiple times. Note that it would be to the student’s advantage to take this exam as early in the degree as possible, so as not to delay degree conferral. Credit earned in MUT 5051 cannot be applied toward degree course work requirements.

Music History Examination
The examination covers all periods of music history and includes two 500-word essays plus the examination and discussion of a musical score. Students may take the exam multiple times. This exam is administered on an as-needed basis at the beginning of the Fall semester.  New graduate students who come to FSU from a non-NASM-accredited institution may be required to demonstrate music history proficiency by either taking the test (if offered) or registering for and successfully completing MUH 5219 (2 credits). Note that it would be to the student’s advantage to take this exam as early in the degree as possible, so as not to delay degree conferral. Credit earned in MUH 5219 cannot be applied toward degree course work requirements.

Applied Music Requirement: Non-performance majors in the Master of Arts degree programs, (except Arts Administration), or performance majors who have submitted a recorded audition.
See AUDITIONS. Note: Non-performance degree students who do not achieve principal level will not be permitted to graduate. Repertoire guidelines can be found on our Music Admissions website.

Vocal Proficiency: Music Education and Music Therapy majors except for voice principals.

  • The student must demonstrate a level of proficiency indicating that they are capable of using the voice as a teaching tool in the classroom. This short, individual exam consists of:
    • the singing of a familiar melody with consistent breath pacing.
    • hearing and reproducing selected intervals on a given vowel.
  • Criteria for evaluation include breath pacing, intonation, adequate range, and acceptable tone quality. Students who do not pass this exam must register for MVV 1111 Class Voice until the vocal deficiencies are remedied, as determined by a passing grade in the course. Credit earned in MVV 1111 is not credited toward the total hours required for the degree and is not covered by a graduate assistant tuition waiver.

Piano Proficiency: Music Education and Music Therapy majors except for piano or organ principals.

  • The student must demonstrate a level of piano ability indicating that they are capable of using the piano as a teaching tool in the classroom. This short, individual exam consists of:
    • playing simple accompaniments
    • improvising simple accompaniments for a given melody
    • playing chords from symbols
    • Students who do not pass this exam must register for MVK 5151 Class Piano until the piano deficiencies are remedied, as determined by a passing grade in the course. Credit earned in MVK 5151 are not credited toward the total hours required for the degree.
Doctoral Diagnostic Examination (if required)

During the first (or second) academic term, if your degree area requires the Doctoral Diagnostic Examination you will successfully complete the exam requirement, obtain the signature of your Area Coordinator, and file the Doctoral Exam Form with the Graduate Music Office. Note that many of our doctoral programs no longer require the Doctoral Diagnostic Examination. Please verify by consulting the Area Coordinator of your degree program. 

A diagnostic examination may be required of doctoral students in music. When utilized, this diagnostic exam fulfills several functions:

1) to determine the student’s strong and weak areas in music and to make recommendations in terms of course work or independent study

2) to assign the student (upon passing the exam) to a major professor who assists the student in developing a program of study.

In the College of Music, the date of a diagnostic exam may vary somewhat from area to area; the area coordinator should be contacted for this information. Usually, a diagnostic exam is given during the first semester of a student’s admission to FSU as a post-master’s student.

Although a post-master’s student may be admitted or readmitted to the Graduate College of Music, official approval to pursue a doctoral degree is not granted until a diagnostic exam is passed, (if a Diagnostic Examination is required), thereby contracting the student to begin a doctoral program of studies. At this point one is a doctoral student and later, after successful completion of the Preliminary Exam, may become a Ph.D. or D.M. candidate.

A Diagnostic Exam is typically presented in three sections:

1) Written Evaluation
May consist of academic questions in the specific area, music literature and style analysis (listening exam), autobiography, philosophy of music or music education essay (Ph.D., Music Education), and/or analysis of works to be performed for the diagnostic exam (D.M. Performance). The written evaluations vary from area to area, and it is advisable to obtain specific information from the area coordinator.

2) Interview
In conference with faculty in the student’s major area, the interview allows for a personal interaction between student and faculty. The student can expect to answer questions regarding career goals, background experience, reasons for seeking a doctoral degree, and specific questions regarding knowledge of music.

3) Performance
(DM performance majors). The student must confer with the coordinator about requirements pertaining to the repertoire and the amount of music to be performed.

If a Diagnostic Examination is required, the document, “Doctoral Exam Form,” will be updated and signed by the area coordinator, then placed in the student’s permanent file (Graduate Music Office). If the student fails a diagnostic exam, the area faculty have the option of allowing the student to retake the exam or terminating the student from the program.

The student has a right to confer with the major professor regarding specific comments notated on a doctoral diagnostic exam report or other forms connected with the diagnostic exam.

There are variations in the procedures described above, depending upon the particular area. For greater detail, see the area coordinator and the charts near the end of this Handbook. All pertinent forms can be found at http://www.music.fsu.edu.

Students are advised that the evaluation of writing skills is often a significant portion of a diagnostic examination. If a Diagnostic Examination is required, failure to complete this exam component successfully may result in the assignment of remedial work in scholarly writing.

Florida Residency

U.S. domestic students who are appointed as graduate assistants in the College of Music are eligible to apply-for the possibility of becoming Florida residents after twelve months, once certain criteria are met. Graduate Assistants who are residents of the United States should note that out-of-state tuition waivers are paid by the College ONLY during the first year of an assistantship; after that the College will provide only an in-state waiver. Thus, applying for Florida residency is financially advantageous. Please note that international students will receive the out-of-state waiver for the duration of the graduate assistantship. All U.S. resident assistantship holders should follow the instructions below:

Graduate Assistants ONLY:

Procedures for reclassification of residency include:

  1. 1) Evidence of legal ties to the State of Florida:
    1. First year, before classes begin: Declaration of Domicile (REQUIRED) obtainable in person from the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the County Court House of the Florida County in which the student claims permanent domicile.  This document must be filed prior to the first day of classes for which you have been admitted to Graduate School. The student must go to: 313 South Calhoun Street, Room # 101 to declare Domicile. The student may contact this office at: 577-4030.
    2. Obtain a Florida driver’s license, voters and vehicle registration. Legal ties with a previous state of residence must be switched to Florida at the time of filing your Declaration of Domicile. In other words, all legal ties must be established in Florida prior to the first day of classes for which you have been admitted to Graduate School.
  2.  Second year, before classes begin: Official confirmation of Graduate Assistantship by the School or College with which you have been on appointment. The graduate assistant verification form (Memo) is available in the FSU Registrar’s Office and must be completed by you and your department representative. (Student fills-in their name, email address, etc.) Second-year students will come to the Graduate Music Office to obtain the Associate Dean’s signature.
    1. Must submit proof (to FSU Registrar) of twelve months’ continuous physical presence in Florida; immediately prior to the first day of classes for the semester you wish to apply for residency. Documentation may include: Florida lease agreements, utility bills, bank records, etc.
    2. Submit an official application for reclassification of residency, with required documentation, prior to the first day of classes for the semester you wish to claim Florida residency. Note: Applications will be accepted no earlier than ten (10) weeks prior to the first day of classes.

Residence in an on-campus dorm facility does not qualify students for Florida residency.  It is advised that GA’s who wish to apply for Florida residency reside in off-campus housing.

All Other Graduate Students:

Graduate students not on assistantship during their first year of enrollment should contact the Registrar’s Office as soon as possible, as the above information does not apply.

Questions regarding residency should be directed to: residency@fsu.edu

FSU Office of Admissions
The Florida State University
A2500 University Center
282 Champions Way
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2400
PHONE: (850) 644-6200

Second Term Considerations

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Supervisory Committee
MASTERS

The Master’s committee consists of a minimum of three faculty members, including the major professor and at least one other member from the major area. Additional members may be appointed if deemed desirable. All must hold at least Graduate Faculty Status. Committee membership should be discussed with the major professor early in the program.

In order to establish the committee officially, the student must (1) obtain the Master’s Supervisory Committee Form online at http://www.music.fsu.edu, (2) have it signed by all committee members and (3) return the completed form to the Graduate Music Office for approval by the Associate Dean/Director of Graduate Studies in Music.

This should normally occur during the second semester in residence (or as soon as possible thereafter).

DOCTORAL

A Supervisory Committee of four members should be selected by the student, in conference with the major professor and with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies in Music, including:

The major professor, (faculty member from the student’s degree or applied area who advises and oversees the dissertation or treatise), and at least two other members from the major field (excepting Guitar and Organ).

At least one faculty member from outside the major area (University Representative). In cases where the directing professor is not the major professor, he/she cannot also serve as the University Representative.

All doctoral committee members (including the University Representative) are required to have Graduate Faculty Status.

The University Representative must be a tenured member of the faculty.

In order to establish the committee officially, the student must (1) obtain the Doctoral Supervisory Committee Form online, (2) have it signed by all committee members and (3) return the completed form to the Graduate Music Office for approval by the Associate Dean/Director of Graduate Studies in Music.

It is highly recommended that the supervisory committee be established and on-file with the Graduate Office by the end of the student’s 2nd semester. Performance majors must establish their committee prior to the first recital. Non-performance majors must establish their committee prior to taking the Preliminary Exam.

Additional information regarding the University Representative:

The University Representative is drawn from outside the student’s department or “area”. The University Representative’s primary role is to ensure that the student is treated fairly and equitably in accordance with University, College, and Departmental guidelines and policies, and that decisions made by the supervisory committee reflect the collective judgement of the committee. The University Representative should verify that the defense is conducted appropriately. This individual should be free of conflicts of interest with other members of the supervisory committee. The University Representative may also provide writing guidance, although content knowledge in the subject of the treatise or dissertation is valuable, but not required. They are required to attend the Defense, as-well, either in-person or via distance technology such-as Skype. Within one week (or by no later than the final Manuscript Clearance Deadline) following the Defense the University Representative must fill out the University Representative Report. On this form the University Representative will complete a brief summary and evaluation on the student’s Defense. A written critique of the Defense is also required. Failure to complete the form and submit it (to me, please!) in a timely manner will delay clearance of the student’s Treatise or Dissertation for graduation.

In addition, the University Representative must hold GFS (Graduate Faculty Status) and be a tenured member of the faculty.

Program of Studies Plan
Masters – Complete an official “Program of Studies” form with the major professor (no later than the beginning of the fourth semester) and submit signed copy to the Graduate Music Office. This form can be found on our website, or may be picked-up from the Graduate Music Office.
Doctoral – Meet with your faculty advisor to develop a study plan for the the degree program according to the Program of Study Form and individual student needs.

During Coursework

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Degree Specific Requirements

Keyboard

  1. Entering DM piano students may be required to take a written literature examination early in their residency
  2. Entering MM piano students may be required to take a test in piano literature.
  3. The graduate committee for piano pedagogy students must include the director of the pedagogy program, the student’s applied instructor, and an at-large member not restricted to the College of Music.

Music Education, Music Therapy, PH.D & MM Choral, and Arts Administration

MUS 5711 (Music Bibliography) may be replaced with “an appropriate substitute.” The substitute may be determined by the student’s major professor, but is intended to be a research course: e.g., MUS 5722 Descriptive Research in Music, MUS 5723 Experimental Research in Music, MUS 5619 Behavior Modification. Substitutes must be noted and approved on the Program of Studies.

For the Arts Administration degree, students will be evaluated at the end of the first spring semester, and will be considered candidates for the degree at that time ONLY if they have:

  1. achieved principal level performance status, satisfied any remedial requirements in music history and theory, and
  2. provided evidence of “practical” management experience either at the College of Music or at an area arts organization.

Strings

All MM Performance students in strings, not including harp, must complete two recitals for the completion of the degree. The first recital may include chamber music.

Music Therapy

  1. Certain classes (4000 level) may apply to the MM Music Therapy degree if approved in advance by Dr. Standley and so noted on the “Program of Studies.”
  2. Clinical-track students complete an examination, while thesis-track students do a defense instead of an examination.

The FSU degree programs in music therapy (undergraduate, equivalency/graduate, and doctorate) are competency based; therefore, requisite skills and therapeutic personality characteristics must be proficiently demonstrated at each level: at admission, during course components and community practica, during pre-internship, and during internship.

The majority of MT courses require community practica in sites providing clinical services to vulnerable persons. Practica agencies require medical histories, fingerprinting, background checks, and drug analyses to screen students prior to participation in their sites and prior to interactions with their clients. Failure to pass such screening will result in immediate dismissal from the impacted courses, and possibly from the MT major. Additionally, students will be required to maintain liability insurance for classes with clinical practica.

To ensure safety of students and community populations, students in the MT programs are required at all times to maintain programmatic, legal, professional, and ethical conduct and standards and to demonstrate sound judgment in interpersonal relationships. These requirements include, but are not limited to:

  • Demonstration of effective communication skills and ability to develop appropriate interpersonal relationships with persons of all ages by responding to others’ individual needs. This includes verbal and nonverbal skills such as directing, questioning, listening, eye contact, facial affect, managing behavior of large groups of clients, maintaining positive, professional relationships with faculty, staff, and other students, etc.
  • Demonstration of proficient clinical musicianship skills on guitar, piano, voice and other instruments as required (e.g., percussion) as well as  memorization of repertoire for persons of varied cultural backgrounds and ages.
  • Demonstration of therapeutic values including nonjudgmental perception of others’ beliefs and values, social concern, empathy, and congruence in relationships.
  • Demonstration of cognitive ability to grasp, relate, transfer, synthesize, and apply academic knowledge in the field of music therapy
  • Demonstration of personal and professional attributes of maturity, dependability, reasoned approach to problem solving, ability to perceive and adjust to situational realities, ability to cope with stress, and maintenance of healthy, balanced lifestyle.

Students whose personal issues impede their ability to contribute to therapeutic change in clients or whose personal conduct does not meet minimal standards for perceived safety of vulnerable clients in clinical settings will be dismissed from the MT program at any point in their program of studies (see academic dismissal procedures). Students with personal issues that prevent demonstration of these basic competencies will be counseled to select other majors.

Voice

  1. Graduate students in voice performance must demonstrate a level of achievement in foreign language study and experience fully equivalent to the FSU Bachelor of Music Voice Performance degree requirement, which consists of 7 semester hours of grammar and diction each in French, German, and Italian.
  2. All foreign language courses, graduate or undergraduate level, used to make up undergraduate language deficiencies may not be credited toward the electives requirement in a voice performance degree.
  3. Graduate students in voice performance must have taken undergraduate-level courses in French Vocal Literature and German Vocal Literature equivalent to the FSU Bachelor of Music degree requirement (MUL 3604 and MUL 4605). Students who are deficient in either of these vocal literature courses may use enrollment in the graduate equivalent of these courses (MUL 5620 and 5621) as elective credits, however these credits may not be applied to the degree requirement of 4 hours of graduate level voice or opera literature.
  4. In order to enroll for Master’s Voice Recital Coaching, an audition requiring a 2/3 positive vote from the attending faculty is needed. The following repertoire is required for this audition: one aria in the original language, one German Lied, one French mélodie, one 20th- or 21st-century American or British song in English, and one piece chosen and prepared independently of any faculty consultation.
  5. Because it is possible to pass a recital examination and then not perform satisfactorily in the recital, it is the responsibility of the performing student’s Supervisory Committee to meet to determine whether that recital should be graded “pass” or “fail.” If the Supervisory Committee fails the student’s recital performance, the Committee must decide whether the recital should be repeated before the Supervisory Committee or in a public performance preceded by an examination. A simple majority vote is required to pass the recital.
  6. The two-hour ensemble requirement in the M.M. Voice Performance degree program must be filled with credits that are approved by the major professor. The course must be an MUN ensemble, not MUO (opera). Note, however, that opera chorus is an MUN ensemble.
  7. The doctoral student’s voice teacher is titled as the student’s Major Professor if the teacher has graduate faculty status. Otherwise, another member of the student’s Supervisory Committee who does have graduate faculty status will be the Major Professor. The Treatise Professor may or may not be the Major Professor, but in any case must have graduate faculty status.

MM Opera Directing

Candidates for the MM Opera (Directing Emphasis) should exhibit strong communicative skills (written and oral) and an appropriate background in visual, theatre, and/or language arts; to be determined and assessed between the application/interview process through the first semester of study. A personal statement, along with such supporting materials (i.e. portfolio, programs, videotapes or prior directing work as available)should accompany the application for admission. A final screening interview and appropriate written assignment of modest length to determine official approval in the program takes place before the end of the first semester in residence.

The Opera Directing Project (MUO 5801) will include a thorough written documentation of the project, including background information on the opera, composer, libretto, and a summary of the composer’s importance in relation to contemporaries; a character analysis of each role; an analysis of the relationship of the score to physical action; technical documentation (ground plan, sketches, lighting plot, lighting cue placement plot, cast list, costume plot, etc.); a critique of the performance; and a bibliography.

The Comprehensive Examination is an oral examination that will include a discussion/defense of the Opera Directing Project. This project will be an operatic scene assignment or, in special cases, a short, one-act opera with the approval of the Director of Opera.

Doctoral Charts – DM Composition
IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION
  • SEMESTER
    • First semester in residence (summer excluded)
  • WRITTEN
    • The written examination will test the applicant’s ability in 3 areas: Music Writing Skills (16th-century counterpoint, harmony), Form and Analysis, and History and Literature (composers, theorists, writers, terminology, and identification of works from standard repertoire).
  • ORAL
    • Quiz on general knowledge of literature, music history, or theory
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Oral section follows submission of compositions
  • ATTENDING FACULTY
    • All area faculty
  • QUORUM
    • Majority of faculty in area
  • REPETITION
    • If the student fails the diagnostic exam, the area faculty have the option of allowing the student to retake the exam or terminating the student from the program.
  • VOTING
    • Open ballot
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • A high degree of competence in composition. A broad knowledge of music literature through study and performance.
  • PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
    • None
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority (area faculty)
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • During last term of course work, or term following.
  • WRITTEN
    • Questions relating to field of major study, not necessarily from course work, but the application of knowledge and skills developed in course work.
  • ORAL
    • Examination is comprehensive in nature, with attention being given to questions concerning written examination, general music, pedagogical, & literature considerations.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Written section taken first
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Submitted when student is ready to write composition.
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Committee follow-through. Major professor and supervisory committee are expected to have checked deficiencies before comprehensive examination.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • High degree of competence and a comprehensive knowledge of the field.
EXAMINATIONS AND RECITALS
  • REQUIREMENT
    • A public performance of chamber works is the only recital for composition students. This recital is not listed as a course and carries no credit. NOTE: Above recital is a performance of student’s compositions. The dissertation, a major work, usually is read by a large ensemble, and is included under dissertation hours (MUS6980r).
  • RECITAL SEQUENCE
    • Chamber works performance required (non-course credit).
  • EXAM TO RECITAL
    • N/A
  • MEMORIZATION
    • N/A
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • VOTING
    • Open ballot
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority (supervisory committee)
  • COMM ATTENDANCE
    • Optional
  • NO PASS RECITAL
    • Major professor notifies Graduate Music Office. Supervisory committee and area faculty confer regarding course of action.
  • APPROVAL
    • Major professor
  • CHAMBER RECITAL
    • N/A
  • RECITAL IN ABSENTIA
    • No
  • NUMBER PER SEMESTER
    • Only one chamber performance is required
  • STUDIO/LECTURE RECITAL
    • N/A
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • Determined by supervisory committee
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Student is guided by Major Professor in the writing of the composition, following the approval of the prospectus by the Major Professor and Supervisory Committee.
  • TYPES
    • Major work for large ensemble, unless student has demonstrated prior faculty.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • May repeat, following revision of composition.
    • Students must register for “Dissertation Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Dissertation.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority
Doctoral Charts – DM Piano and Organ
IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION

Please contact the Area Coordinator.

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • After all course work has been completed.
  • WRITTEN
    • Comprehensive in nature. Written questions will be submitted by each member of the student’s supervisory committee, normally at the beginning of the tenth week of the semester. See #4 below.
  • ORAL
    • Comprehensive in nature, lasting ca. two hours, following the written examination.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • From the time the candidate receives the questions from the committee (normally the tenth week of the semester), he or she will have two weeks to research and write the answers. The oral exam follows one week after written answers to the questions have been distributed to committee members, and before the end of the semester.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Unanimous vote of supervisory committee.
  • REPETITION
    • Once.
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Not required at the examination.
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Committee has responsibility for follow-through.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Student must be able to teach effectively, give superior solo performance, and have a broad and extensive repertoire.
EXAMINATIONS AND RECITALS
  • REQUIREMENTS
    • MVK6985-6 (public solo recital): Examination prior to performance required. Vote taken by supervisory committee and area faculty. NOTE: One work (not to exceed twelve minutes in length) which was used on the diagnostic examination may be performed on one of the two solo recitals.
    • MVK6987 (lecture recital): The candidate is expected to prepare, without faculty assistance, one or more works written in the last twenty-five years. The work(s) should be of a major scope. Topics and/or works presented must be passed by the candidate’s supervisory committee. The presentation should be limited to approximately fifty minutes, at least fifteen of which is lecture. If memorized, the work(s) chosen may be performed again as part of a public solo recital. Vote taken by Supervisory Committee.
    • MVK6988 (chamber recital): Examination required prior to performance. Preferably all on one recital. Vote taken by Supervisory Committee.
  • RECITAL SEQUENCE
    • No specific order. Sequence is based in part on availability of ensembles.
  • SPACING
    • At least two weeks between recitals.
  • MEMORIZATION
    • Piano: All solo recitals should be memorized. (Exceptions may be allowed for certain contemporary compositions, with faculty approval.)
    • Organ: One of the two solo recitals should be memorized.
  • REPETITION OF RECITAL EXAMINATION
    • Once, with permission of Supervisory Committee.
  • VOTING
    • Secret ballot.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 3/4 majority.
  • COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE
    • Committee attends.
  • NO-PASS RECITAL
    • Major professor notifies Graduate Music Office. Supervisory committee members confer regarding course of action.
  • APPROVAL
    • Supervisory committee.
  • RECITAL IN ABSENTIA
    • See Coordinator.
  • NUMBER IN ONE SEMESTER
    • No more than two recitals in any given semester.
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • Determined by supervisory committee. Following the approval of the prospectus, performance majors may write a treatise at any time after beginning their recital series (MVK6985-9), since the treatise and the recital series collectively constitute a “dissertation.”
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Normally the major professor supervises the writing of the treatise. The committee may recommend changes after reading it in preparation for the defense.
  • TYPES
    • On the level of a master’s thesis, which should be scholarly and practical in the area of performance.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • Students must register for “Treatise Defense” (MUS 8985) during the semester in which they defend their Treatise. You may not enroll for “Treatise Defense” more than one time.
    • The defense may be repeated only once.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Unanimous.
  • NOTE:Students must register for “Treatise Defense” (MUS 8985, 0 cr.) only during the semester in which they defend their Treatise.
Doctoral Charts – DM Strings
EXAMINATIONS AND RECITALS

REQUIREMENT: Doctoral students in performance will perform four recitals and a concerto performance as described below. Please note that no specific order is prescribed:

  • MVS6985 (solo): Jury examination prior to recital is required, and must be attended by the string area faculty.
  • MVS6986 (solo): Jury examination prior to recital is required, and must be attended by student’s committee
  • MVS6987 (studio/lecture recital): Jury examination prior to recital not required. Recital is heard by supervisory committee. There must be a minimum of four committee members at the recital. Studio/lecture recital is independently prepared. Must consist of works not previously performed. Total duration: 40 minutes minimum, 45 minutes maximum (divided roughly by 20 mins. of lecture and 20 mins. of performance). Questions may be asked of candidate after recital at the discretion of the supervisory committee.
  • MVS6988 (chamber): Examination prior to recital is required. Jury examination is heard by supervisory committee.
  • Doctoral Concerto Jury Requirement: Doctoral students are required to perform a complete concerto performance for the string area faculty by the end of the second month of any semester. The concerto is to be memorized except in the case of a 20th or 21st century concerto. Winners of the Doctoral Concerto Competition satisfy this requirement by performing with the University Symphony Orchestra.
  • All recital jury examinations are heard no less than 10 days prior to the scheduled recital.
  • RECITAL SEQUENCE
    • No specific order is required.
  • MEMORIZATION
    • Memorization is determined as per the requirements of each studio.
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat within contiguous semesters
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority (supervisory committee or area faculty)
  • COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE AT JURIES AND STUDIO LECTURE RECITAL
    • Required. Students are responsible for identifying a substitute if any of the committee members are unable to attend.
  • NO PASS RECITAL
    • Major professor notifies Graduate Music Office. Supervisory Committee and area faculty confer regarding course of action
  • APPROVAL
    • Major professor and supervisory committee
  • CHAMBER RECITAL
    • All on one program
  • RECITAL IN ABSENTIA
    • See Coordinator
  • NUMBER PER SEMESTER
    • No more than two recitals in any given semester
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • Final written and oral examination is taken after all course work has been completed.
  • WRITTEN
    • The preliminary exam for the DM in String Performance consists of presenting a completed prospectus for the treatise and the response to at least one comprehensive question as determined by the major professor.
  • ORAL
    • See above.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • 1-2 weeks between written and oral examinations
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority constitutes a pass
  • REPETITION
    • If a student fails the examination, one further attempt is given to pass within a period of 3-6 months.
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Submitted at preliminary. The student will submit a completed treatise prospectus, complete at least one comprehensive exam question, and will schedule an oral defense of the exam components with the doctoral committee. The major professor must approve the prospectus prior to submission to the committee and will determine the content of the comprehensive question(s).
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Superior performing musician and teacher, superior musical scholarship, broad comprehensive knowledge of music history, music literature, and performance practices.
TREATISE
  • TIME
    • Determined by supervisory committee following successful completion of the preliminary exam. The treatise and the recital series collectively constitute a “dissertation”.
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Major professor supervises the writing of the treatise. The Committee recommends changes after reading it in preparation for the defense.
  • TYPES
    • The treatise must be written on a subject related to the student’s major field.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • One repeat – within six months.
    • Students must register for “Treatise Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Treatise. You must never enroll for “Treatise Defense” more than one time.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority vote

For additional details, please refer to the FSU String Player’s Guide to Grad School which may be found on the String Area Blackboard site.

Doctoral Charts – DM Voice
IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION
  • SEMESTER
    • Usually first semester in residence, but no later than second semester (summer excluded)
  • WRITTEN

Written portion – timed section (this exam will take place early in the first semester of study – look for the posting of the exact date/time on the Voice Area Bulletin Board on the 3rd floor of the KMU Building.) In order to ascertain the student’s general knowledge about vocal pedagogy and literature upon beginning study at FSU, each student will take a broad, comprehensive term/name identification test. The student will have two hours to write a short paragraph for each of 40 terms/names (approximately three minutes for each paragraph). The terms will be selected from the areas of vocal pedagogy, opera literature and German/French/American/English song literature. The responses to these 40 terms/names will be reviewed by appropriate faculty members prior to the diagnostic recital. If there are serious concerns about a student’s lack of knowledge in a particular area, the student’s voice teacher and the DM Voice Advisor will devise a plan to assist the student in filling in areas of study that are lacking (possible course work, research assignments, assigned reading, etc.)

Written portion – untimed section: In order to ascertain the student’s knowledge of research techniques and advanced academic writing style, the voice teacher in consultation with the DM Voice Advisor will design a research essay question to be submitted to the student at least one month prior to the diagnostic recital. The student will research and write a 5 – 7 page essay (presented in 12 point font and double spaced) in response to the assigned question. The essay must include footnotes and a bibliography. This is an exercise in gathering information and organizing it in a clear, structured, concise, yet thorough written form. Students are strongly advised to restrict their writing to the specific content of the question, and not expand into tangents or information that is not directly pertinent to the question. The quality of the research and the writing will be evaluated to determine if the student is adequately prepared to research and write a DM doctoral treatise. If there are serious concerns about a student’s ability to do research and/or write effectively at the doctoral level, the student’s voice teacher in consultation with the DM Voice Advisor and possibly other members of the voice area faculty will devise a plan to assist the student in preparing to write a successful doctoral treatise (course work, additional research assignments, etc.) All written material for the diagnostic exam (essay, timed written answers, diagnostic recital program, and a vita containing information relating to the student’s career goals, prior education, professional experience, and language training) must be submitted to the entire voice area faculty one week prior to the diagnostic recital examination. The voice teacher will be responsible for the distribution of the timed portion of the examination including any analyses of the results done by the faculty involved in the exam and the student will be responsible for the distribution of the written essay, recital program and vita.

  • ORAL

Oral portion – the diagnostic recital: This shall be a recital no shorter than 20 minutes and no longer than 25 minutes including songs and arias representing at least four major languages (English, German, French, and Italian) and representing a variety of periods and styles including literature ranging from Baroque/Classical to 20th/21st Century. Examples of Lieder and mélodie should be included. Note that the time limit is important, for the student may have only that amount of time available in the recital hall.

Oral portion-the interview: Immediately following the diagnostic recital, the student will meet with the voice area faculty to discuss the submitted essay, any issues with the terms/names, the recital program and the student’s vita.

  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • A copy of the written section (essay, timed written answers, diagnostic recital program, and a vita containing information relating to the student’s career goals, prior education, professional experience, and language training) must be submitted to every member of the Voice Examination and Audition Committee at least 1 week prior to the oral diagnostic examination (recital).
  • ATTENDING FACULTY
    • Voice Examination and Audition Committee: consists of voice faculty and other faculty appointed by the Dean.
  • QUORUM
    • A minimum of 5 faculty members.
  • REPETITION
    • If the student fails the diagnostic exam, the area faculty have the option of allowing the student to retake the exam or terminating the student from the program.
  • VOTING
    • Written ballot with option of comments
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Voice quality on a professional level, with minimum technical problems, appearance and personality appropriate to a performing artist, and ability to communicate artistically and musically, and to maintain a high scholastic standing.
  • PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
    • Professional performance and/or teaching experience is expected, but exceptionally well-qualified, mature students are accepted without having had such experience.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority (Voice Examination and Audition Committee)
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • Normally taken during the final semester of coursework. Must be taken and passed prior to registering for treatise credit hours.
  • WRITTEN/ORAL
    • Timed portion: (given once early in the fall term and at least once early in the spring term on a Wednesday afternoon). The total time for this examination will be two and-a-half hours.
      • Translation examination (60 minutes): The student chooses one of three languages (French, German, or Italian) and will have one hour to complete the translation. The student may use a dictionary and verb book but no grammar book for this process. This translation will become part of the student’s preliminary examination.
      • Essay question (90 minutes): The student will receive an essay question that is designed by the major professor specifically for the individual student as a result of a review of the student’s coursework at FSU. The supervisory committee must approve the question before it is given to the student.
      • A final draft of the prospectus must be submitted as part of the preliminary examination.
    • Oral portion:
    1. Copies of the Program of Studies Form that was completed early in this semester must be distributed to all members of the DM Supervisory Committee at least two weeks prior to the oral examination. In addition, the final draft of the prospectus and copies of the answers to the timed portion of the written examination must be given to the supervisory committee at least two weeks prior to the oral examination. The student is responsible for the distribution of the prospectus and the Program of Studies Form and the major professor, for the distribution of the answers to the written portion of the exam. The oral exam will include
      • a defense of the timed written answers including an oral reading of the foreign language passage that was translated,
      • a review and final approval of the prospectus,
      • oral terminology/name identification based on the results of the diagnostic examination and coursework for the degree, (Note: a copy of the diagnostic examination will be given to the supervisory committee members by the major professor at least two weeks prior to the oral examination.)
      • and any other oral questions the committee members would like to present based on the content of the student’s Program of Studies Form.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Committee and candidate should convene for the oral examination soon after the written examination materials have been distributed to the committee members, but no earlier than two weeks from that distribution date. The oral examination usually does not exceed a two-hour time frame. The oral examination will further delve into your comprehension of your major field of study, so you may bring notes and other supporting materials.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • PROSPECTUS
    • The Prospectus for the Treatise is a portion of the preliminary examination and therefore must be completed prior to taking that exam. See the submission requirements in the WRITTEN/ORAL section of the diagnostic examination above.
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Candidate’s committee has responsibility to follow through with recommendations made at the diagnostic examination.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • The student must be able to demonstrate in particular a comprehensive and authoritative knowledge of vocal pedagogy and performance practices, and also an understanding of all areas of music generally. The student must be able to perform at a level acceptable to community concert audiences and university faculties anywhere.
EXAMINATIONS AND RECITALS
  • REQUIREMENT NOTE
    • Specific written instructions and procedures for each type of voice recital should be obtained from the major voice teacher (or Coordinator).
    • MVV6985-6 (public; one or two required-see program of studies): Examination prior to performance required. Examination is heard by supervisory committee and Voice Examination and Audition committee.
    • MVV 6987 (lecture recital/demonstration): The lecture recital/demonstration is part of the final process of completing the Doctor of Music degree in Voice Performance and the topic for the recital/demonstration must be an outgrowth of the treatise topic. As such, the lecture/recital demonstration must be presented after the completion of the final draft of the treatise paper and its submission to the student’s DM Supervisory Committee. It is recommended that the lecture recital/demonstration be scheduled on the same date and immediately prior to the treatise defense. The content of this recital (MVV 6987) is quite flexible. The topic of this recital presentation is based on the content of the treatise. It is a minimum of 30 minutes and a maximum of 45 minutes with no more than half of the time devoted to discourse. However, should the treatise topic be, for example, one of scientific research such as in the area of voice science, then the 30 to 45 minute presentation may be more demonstration than a performance recital. The student should discuss the manner of presentation in detail with the major professor; however, the preparation is done independently by the student. The candidate must meet with the members of his/her supervisory committee immediately following the lecture recital to defend the presented material. This meeting is usually followed by the formal treatise defense since the lecture recital is an outgrowth of the treatise. The lecture recital/demonstration is an exercise that is designed to fit into a normal class period of 50 minutes (a 45 minute presentation with 5 minutes of questions from the audience). Should the entire presentation exceed this time frame, the supervisory committee may consider whether or not to accept the presentation.
    • MVV6989 (Large Ensemble/Opera Role; one or two required-see the program of studies): Exam prior to performance not required. Vote by supervisory committee after performance.
  • RECITAL SEQUENCE
    • All DM Voice students are required to do one public recital (MVV 6985) and one performance of a major work with a large ensemble accompaniment (MVV 6989). This latter requirement may be fulfilled by performing a major opera role with Florida State Opera or performing as major soloist in an oratorio or symphonic performance. Students must understand that casting in operas and for solo opportunities with orchestra at FSU is done through an audition process, and that the performance or role must be approved by the supervisory committee to count as part of the recital requirements for the DM degree. A third required recital is the lecture recital/demonstration which shall be explained later in this document along with the treatise defense explanation. A fourth recital is also required and the student must choose either a second public recital (MVV 6986) or a second MVV 6989 recital, which may be a second major opera role (if the first MVV 6989 recital was an opera role) or a performance of a major solo in a major work with a large ensemble. The supervisory committee must approve the choice of this fourth recital requirement. in addition, if the choice is to do an opera role as a second MVV 6989 recital, the opera faculty must agree that the student will be cast in a role that will fulfill the requirements for that recital. The content of the recitals should refelct the artistic ability and goals of the student and must be approved at the point of repertoire selection by the supervisory committee. There is no specific content requirement; however, it is the responsibility of the supervisory committee to be certain that the student includes repertoire that is appropriate to doctoral level performance. The student therefore must submit a written copy of the proposed recital repertoire to each member of the supervisory committee as the student begins work on the recital. The committee members must sign the copy of the repertoire indicating approval and the signed copy must be returned to the student’s voice teacher (and Major Professor if it is not the voice teacher). Solo recitals (MVV 6985 abd 6986) must each contain 50 to 60 minutes of actual music (no more or less).
  • EXAM TO RECITAL
    • Generally a minimum of 10-14 days. All performers who are involved in the recital must attend the recital examination. This includes all players in any chamber music presentation.
  • MEMORIZATION
    • All must for solo recitals must be memorized (MVV 6985 and 6986). An exception may be granted for music considered to be chamber music, which must include at least two instrumental performers. Requests for permission to perform with sheet music for chamber music and for non-chamber music (in the case of extremely difficult “modern” music) must be presented to the student’s supervisory committee well in advance of the recital examination date. A majority of the DM supervisory committee must agree to any such exceptions. It is suggested that the request to perform with sheet music be submitted to the DM supervisory committee at the same time as the request for approving the actual recital repertoire. Approval for both must be in writing and the copies of the approval must be kept on file by the Major Professor. The use of sheet music for the lecture/demonstration recital is at the discretion of the student.
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • VOTING
    • Written ballot with option of comments
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority of area faculty and supervisory committee
  • COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE
    • Supervisory Committee attends the actual recital performance.
  • NO PASS RECITAL
    • Major professor or Coordinator notifies Graduate Music Office. By a majority vote of the Supervisory Committee the student may be required to repeat the recital.
  • APPROVAL
    • Approved by the committees as indicated in Item 1 above
  • CHAMBER MUSIC FOR SOLO RECITALS
    • As approved and/or required by the major professor and the supervisory committee the DM voice performance student may include chamber works on his/her solo recital(s). Approval to perform such works must come from the supervisory committee well in advance of the recital examination date.
  • RECITAL IN ABSENTIA
    • CD recordings and other documentation of off-campus performances for MVV6989 may be submitted to the Supervisory Committee for approval. All other recitals must be performed on campus.
  • NUMBER PER SEMESTER
    • More than two is not recommended
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • Upon passing the preliminary examination, the student is admitted to doctoral candidacy and is cleared to pursue a dissertation or treatise. A prospectus of the treatise is required at the time of the preliminary examination.
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • The student, who may select any member of the graduate music faculty to assist in the writing of the treatise, consults with the Major Professor and Supervisory Committee as need arises.
  • TYPE
    • Treatise option: The treatise must be a scholarly, research oriented formal treatise related to the student’s major field.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • May repeat, following revision of scholarly paper or treatise. (Note that the defense of scholarly paper or treatise may not be combined with the Preliminary Examination.)
    • Students must register for “Treatise Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Treatise. You must never enroll for “Treatise Defense” more than one time.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Simple majority vote of the supervisory committee.
Doctoral Charts – DM Woodwinds, Brass and Percussion
IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION
  • SEMESTER
    • Must be passed no later than second semester in residence.
  • WRITTEN
    • Submit evidence of teaching and/or professional experience in the form of a personal vita. Provide written program notes for the diagnostic performance which demonstrate scholarly writing skills. Guidelines are available from the wind area coordinator or major professor.
  • ORAL
    • Recital-audition examination followed by interview with faculty to answer questions over works performed (examples listed in Diagnostic Guide). Answer questions concerning teaching and/or performing experience. Note: the diagnostic program should be played with piano accompaniment and should represent three styles (exception for DM candidates in Percussion: those requirements are available from Dr. Parks).
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • One copy of written program notes, vita, and program copies will be distributed to Area Coordinator one week prior to examination, the other six are to be placed in designated faculty mailboxes in HMU 204. The oral examination occurs immediately following the performance. Please see the Diagnostic Guide for more information.
  • ATTENDING FACULTY
    Selected committee consisting of six members of the wind/percussion area
    faculty.
  • QUORUM
    • 2/3 of faculty in area designated to attend the examination
    • If the student fails the diagnostic exam, the area faculty has the option of allowing the student to retake the exam one additional time during the following semester. If the second exam is not passed, the student will be terminated from the degree program.
  • VOTING
    • Committee deliberation.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Performance standards: (1) program selected from current literature, (b) demonstrate potential level comparable to professional performer, (c) performance demonstrates: boldness, decisiveness, accuracy, authority, conviction and artistry.
  • PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
    • Professional performance and/or teaching experience is expected; exceptionally well-qualified, mature students may be accepted without having had such experience.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority.
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • Final written and oral examination is taken either during the last semester of coursework or after all course work has been completed.
  • WRITTEN
    • 4 questions will be given to the student. Comprehensive in nature with details left to the discretion of the examination committee.
  • ORAL
    • Same as for written section.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Student must complete written answers within one week of receiving questions from each committee member. Oral defense normally one week after written answers submitted.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority constitutes a pass
  • REPETITION
    • If a student fails either examination, the area faculty has the option of allowing one additional attempt within a period of 3-6 months.
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Submitted at preliminary
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Candidate’s committee has responsibility to follow through with recommendations made at the diagnostic examination.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Superior performing musician and teacher, superior musical scholarship, broad comprehensive knowledge of music history, music literature, and performance practices.
EXAMINATIONS AND RECITALS
  • REQUIREMENT
    • MV6985 (public): Examination prior to recital is not required.
    • MV6986 (public): Examination prior to recital is not required.
    • MV6987 (lecture): Examination prior to recital not required. A proposal describing the content of the lecture recital must be approved by the supervisory committee. Vote taken by supervisory committee after performance. Must pass by 2/3 majority. 45-50 minutes.
    • MV6988 (chamber): Examination prior to recital is required. Examination is heard by area faculty 10-14 days before the recital.
  • RECITAL SEQUENCE
    • No specific order is required, except that the Lecture Recital should be the last one in the sequence.
  • MEMORIZATION
    • None required
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat may be permissible within contiguous semesters with approval from the supervisory committee.
  • VOTING
    • Committee deliberation.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority of supervisory committee.
  • COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE
    • Attends
  • NO PASS RECITAL
    • Major professor notifies Grad. Music Office, faculty supervisory committee and Graduate Music Office confer regarding course of action.
  • APPROVAL
    • Major professor and/or supervisory committee
  • CHAMBER RECITAL
    • All on one program (see area Coordinator for exceptions)
  • RECITAL IN ABSENTIA
    • See Coordinator
  • NUMBER PER SEMESTER
    • No more than two recitals in any given semester
  • LECTURE RECITAL
    • Must consist of works not previously performed. Total duration is 45-50 minutes. A proposal describing the content of the lecture recital must be approved by the student’s committee two months in advance of the recital. The recital will be heard by the student’s committee, and a passing vote of 2/3 is necessary. It is unlikely that the lecture recital can occur during Summer Term because of faculty availability; contact the coordinator well in advance.
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • Determined by supervisory committee. Following the approval of the prospectus, performance majors may write a treatise at any time after beginning their recital series (MV6985-9), since the treatise and the recital series collectively constitute a “dissertation”.
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Major professor supervises the writing of the treatise. The Committee recommends changes after reading it in preparation for the defense.
  • TYPES
    • The treatise must be written on a subject related to the student’s major field.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • One repeat – within six months
    • Students must register for “Treatise Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Treatise. You must never enroll for “Treatise Defense” more than one time.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority vote
Doctoral Charts – PHD Musicology

IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION

  • SEMESTER
    • One week before registration week of Fall semester (second week before classes begin)
  • WRITTEN
    • Five 2-3 hour examinations over a 5-day period. Questions from the Musicology faculty test the applicant’s knowledge of history and literature, familiarity with current areas of musicological research sources, and scholarly writings.
  • ORAL
    • An interview with the Musicology faculty which may include questions arising from the written examination and an inquiry into the applicant’s academic background and professional experience.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • A copy of the written examination should be delivered to each faculty member in the area one week prior to the scheduled oral examination. The oral examination will be held during the registration week of Fall semester.
  • ATTENDING FACULTY
    • All area faculty
  • QUORUM
    • Majority of faculty in area
  • REPETITION
    • If the student fails the diagnostic exam, the area faculty have the option of allowing the student to retake the exam or terminating the student from the program.
  • VOTING
    • Open ballot
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Commitment to the sustained pursuit of scholarly excellence and distinction. Evidence of ability and academic competence to attain that goal.
  • PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
    • Professional experience is desirable but not required.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority (area faculty).
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • After all course work has been completed.
  • WRITTEN
    • Questions of a comprehensive nature as well as those specifically related to the major field of study are submitted by each member of the supervisory committee.
  • ORAL
    • Expands on areas covered in written examination and checks on the student’s progress in overcoming deficiencies noted on the diagnostic examination.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • A copy of the written examination should be delivered to each member of the supervisory committee one week prior to the scheduled oral examination.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Submitted either during or after preliminary examination, at the discretion of the Major Professor.
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Committee follow-through. Major Professor and supervisory committee are expected to have checked deficiencies before the written examinations. An ongoing review of the student’s progress and qualifications is conducted as part of the 4 semesters of Advanced Seminar in Musicology.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Comprehensive knowledge of the field; demonstrated research skills; verbal and writing skills.
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • University minimum.
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Students work primarily with Major Professor, with access to supervisory committee members as needed. First draft is submitted to the committee after approval by the major professor.
  • TYPES
    • In consultation with the Major Professor, topics may be drawn from any of the recognized sub-disciplines of Musicology. The dissertation must be an achievement in original research, constituting a significant contribution to knowledge.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • Once
    • Students must register for “Dissertation Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Dissertation. You must never enroll for “Dissertation Defense” more than one time.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority
Doctoral Charts – PHD Music Education
IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION
  • SEMESTER
    • Fall semester
  • WRITTEN
    • Graduate Music Classification Examination, literature examination, autobiographical form, research paper, monitored essay, letters of recommendation.
  • ORAL
    • Orals occupy one hour and give the student the opportunity to prove qualifications not clear in the written examination.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Written examinations followed in 3 days by oral examination
  • ATTENDING FACULTY
    • Music Education faculty with graduate directive status
  • QUORUM
    • Faculty present
  • REPETITION
    • If the student fails the diagnostic exam, the area faculty have the option of allowing the student to retake the exam or terminating the student from the program.
  • VOTING
    • Open ballot
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Relatively high standing of GMCE, performance and evidence of musicianship, solid undergraduate and master’s degrees at recognized schools, evidence of leadership and success in profession, intellectual curiosity, evidence of scholarship and knowledge of what degree is about. “Master Teacher” qualities sought in Ed.D. candidates.
  • PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
    • Experience is not always a pre-examination requirement for Ph.D. program, but contractual experience is considered desirable and is preferred. Ed.D. program requires at least two years (preferably more) of highly successful teaching experience.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Unanimous
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • During last term of course work, sometimes after course work
  • WRITTEN
    • Music literature; identification of music periods and styles; curriculum, philosophy, and theory of music education; statistics or other research tools. Special question from major professor.
  • ORAL
    • Questions about answers that were not clear in written sections, questions regarding research project, miscellaneous comprehensive questions.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Approximately one week sequence
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Unanimous
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Submitted either during or after preliminary examination, at the discretion of the Major Professor.
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Left to Major Professor, Committee follow-through at examination.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Comprehensive knowledge of the field, research capability, demonstrated dedication to music education, refined writing skills. Signs of professional leadership.
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • University minimum.
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Interaction between Major Professor and student with guidance from committee.
  • TYPES
    • Research dissertation that contributes original knowledge to field (Ph.D.); research dissertation applying existing theories or the original solution of a music education problem (Ed.D.)
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • Once
    • Students must register for “Dissertation Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Dissertation. You must never enroll for “Dissertation Defense” more than one time.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Unanimous
Doctoral Charts – PHD Music Theory
IF REQUIRED BY THE AREA: DIAGNOSTIC EXAMINATION
  • SEMESTER
    • Prior to admission
  • WRITTEN
    • The written examination will test the applicant’s ability in 3 areas: Music Writing Skills (16th-century counterpoint, harmony), Form and Analysis, and History and Literature (composers, theorists, writers, terminology, and identification of works from standard repertoire).
  • ORAL
    • The oral section of the examination will consist of questions pertaining to music theory, questions arising from the written section of the examination, and inquiry into the applicant’s background of training and experience.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Prior to admission
  • ATTENDING FACULTY
    • All theory faculty
  • QUORUM
    • Majority of theory faculty
  • REPETITION
    • If the student fails the diagnostic exam, the area faculty have the option of allowing the student to retake the exam or terminating the student from the program.
  • VOTING
    • Open ballot
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • performance skill-musicianship,
    • academic competency,
    • knowledge of the field,
    • pedagogical as well as research ability,
    • an alert mind, capable of incisive action under pressure.
  • PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
    • None
  • PASSING VOTE
    • 2/3 majority of area faculty present
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
  • DATE
    • During or subsequent to the final semester of a student’s course work (but not during the summer term)
  • WRITTEN
    • The written examination will test the applicant’s knowledge in 4 areas: Writing Skills (16th century counterpoint, fugue, harmony); History and Literature (theorists, tape, essays); Form and Analysis; and Bibliography. Administered during the 12th week of the semester
  • ORAL
    • Stresses the student’s spontaneous facility with musical materials dealt with in teaching and other professional situations; including, but not limited to, keyboard skills, analysis, and writing. Administered during finals week of the semester.
  • TIME SEQUENCE
    • Written: 12th week of the semester. Oral: Finals week of the semester.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority
  • REPETITION
    • One repeat
  • PROSPECTUS
    • Usually submitted after preliminary examination.
  • RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Committee follow-through. Major professor and supervisory committee are expected to have checked deficiencies before comprehensive examination.
  • QUALITIES SOUGHT
    • Demonstration of superior performance, scholastic, and research skills.
TREATISE/DISSERTATION/COMPOSITION
  • TIME
    • University minimum. Dissertation must be submitted by the fifth Wednesday of the semester during which the student expects to graduate. Defense is scheduled during the 10th week of that semester.
  • MAJOR PROFESSOR/COMMITTEE
    • Students work chiefly with the major professor with access to committee members as needed. First draft of dissertation is submitted to the committee after it is approved by the major professor.
  • TYPES
    • Analytical, historical, descriptive, and experimental research.
  • DEFENSE REPETITION
    • Once
    • Students must register for “Dissertation Defense” only during the semester in which they defend their Dissertation. You must never enroll for “Dissertation Defense” more than one time.
  • PASSING VOTE
    • Majority

Thesis, Treatise, Dissertation & Recitals

Expand All
Prospectus

The prospectus is completed at about the same time as the Preliminary Examination and constitutes the official “proposal” for the thesis, dissertation, or treatise. Preliminary work on the prospectus and instruction in preparing the prospectus are part of the requirements for MUS 5711 Music Bibliography, a class required of nearly all graduate students in the College of Music.

The content of the prospectus typically includes the following categories: the statement and scope of the problem, hypotheses, definitions, assumption, limitations and significance of the study, justification of the topic, a brief review of related research, procedures and methods to be followed, anticipated organization of the proposed thesis/treatise/dissertation, and a bibliography.

Final decisions regarding content of the prospectus are made by the major professor. When the prospectus is approved and signed by all members of the committee, a copy of the title and signature pages should be filed with the Graduate Music Office. This is to ensure that this important step has been completed and that the title of the project will be listed accurately in the graduation program.

Style manuals do not describe a format for the prospectus. The Manuscript Clearance Advisor (314 Westcott) has copies of the Florida State University publication, Guidelines and Requirements for Thesis, Treatise and Dissertation Writers, which provides some information about the prospectus. All students will need this publication, as it also provides certain style guidelines for all T/D/T submitted to Florida State University.

NOTE: The title and signature pages of the prospectus document must be approved (signed) by the supervisory committee and filed in the Graduate Music Office. Students must submit this to the Graduate Music Office, at the time of completion/approval. Completion of the prospectus is not sufficient for registration of treatise/dissertation hours; doctoral students must pass the Preliminary (Comprehensive) Exam and be admitted to candidacy before treatise/dissertation hours can be added to the schedule.

String Area Policies:
For the doctoral preliminary exam in strings the student will submit a completed treatise prospectus, complete at least one comprehensive exam question, and will schedule an oral defense of the exam components with the doctoral committee.The major professor must approve the prospectus prior to submission to the committee and will determine the content of the comprehensive question (s). The student will have seven days to complete the written response to the comprehensive portion of the exam and must submit the response and prospectus to the committee members at least two weeks prior to the oral defense

Masters Thesis

With the exception of the performance areas, we offer certain master’s programs that provide the option for a written thesis. These plans include Music Theory, Music Therapy, Music Education and the MA General degree.  The Master’s in Musicology and the Master’s in Composition each require a written thesis and the option of a non-thesis path is not available for these degree plans.  Work on the thesis normally does not begin before the student’s second semester in residence, but in some instances the student’s major professor may decide that preparatory work should begin earlier.

A student who has completed the required course work and continues to use campus facilities and/or receives faculty supervision, but has not made a final thesis submission shall include in the required full-time load a minimum of two (2) credit hours of thesis per semester until completion of the degree (this includes the student’s final semester). The credit hours for MUS 5971r are variable (1-6), but a general formula is a work/hour ratio of 2:1. For example, if an individual plans to spend 6 hours per week working on the thesis during a semester, registration for MUS 5971r should be 3 hours. In addition, students must register for MUS 8976 (0 credit) during the semester of the thesis defense.

From the FSU Graduate Bulletin: “A student who enrolls in thesis hours need not be enrolled continuously thereafter in thesis hours if they meet the minimum University requirement for full-time or part-time enrollment through other coursework. A student must be enrolled in a minimum of two thesis hours in the semester of graduation. The minimum number of thesis hours required for the master’s degree is six. Those with underload permission must register for at least two credit hours of thesis per semester. Underloads must be approved by the student’s academic dean. Before registering for thesis hours, the student must consult the major professor as to the proportion of time to be devoted to thesis work. For thesis-seeking master’s students, after completion of the required coursework and six credit hours of thesis, master’s students must be enrolled for a minimum of three credit hours per semester (of which at least two must be thesis hours) until completion of the degree.”

At a time determined by the major professor and as a first step in the thesis process, a prospectus of the thesis will be circulated to the student’s committee. The student should not continue work on the thesis until the prospectus has the signed approval of the committee. The student is cautioned to work closely with the major professor in preparation of both the prospectus and the thesis. Furthermore, it is advisable to seek help from the committee members when problems in style and content arise. It must be stressed, however, that proper development of the thesis is the student’s responsibility; the major professor and committee members cannot be expected to provide total guidance. By the same token, remaining aloof from both major professor and the committee most certainly will result in problems.

Format of the prospectus and thesis must be consistent. One style manual should be used. Usually, the type of thesis will determine the particular manual. Students writing a music education or music therapy thesis probably will use the current edition of the APA manual, and students should consult the major professor for advice. Turabian might be more appropriate for an historical or philosophical study, whereas Irvine’s book is often used for a theory thesis. The Chicago Manual of Style is the ultimate reference of the Manuscript Clearance Advisor. See also the entry for Prospectus in this Handbook.

Submitting Your Manuscript:

  1. What you will need:

• Your manuscript in PDF format, with embedded fonts (information on embedding fonts can be found on the UMI ETD site)

• A credit card (if you are selecting services beyond Traditional Publishing, or ordering copies)

  1. Decisions you will make:

• You will choose between Traditional Publishing and Open Access Publishing. Traditional Publishing is free (this is a change for Fall 2011 and beyond) and Open Access Publishing costs $95. Traditional Publishing means that readers have to pay UMI (ProQuest) for access to your full work. Open Access Publishing means that your work will be available for free, in its entirety, in the ProQuest system.

• You will choose whether or not you want major search engines to find your work in the ProQuest system.

• You will choose whether or not you want to allow ProQuest to allow third party retailers to sell copies of your work.

• You will choose whether to have ProQuest make your work available immediately upon publication, or to embargo your work for two years (or permanently)

• You will choose whether or not you want ProQuest to register a copyright of your thesis/treatise/dissertation, on your behalf, with the U.S. Office of Copyright. This is an optional service costing $55.

• If desired, you will order printed copies of your thesis/treatise/dissertation from ProQuest (this is optional)

  1. Steps you will take:

• Create a Registration in the UMI ETD Administration site (www.etdadmin.com/fsu)

• Read the instructions

• Select publishing options

• Read and accept the ProQuest/UMI agreement

• Enter your contact information

• Enter information about your thesis/treatise/dissertation

• Upload your manuscript

• Select whether or not you want ProQuest to register a copyright on your thesis/treatise/dissertation

• Order copies (optional)

• Double-check your information and click”Submit Dissertation/Thesis” to send your manuscript to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor for initial format check

Please note:

• This submission is the first step in the manuscript clearance process. At a minimum, you will have to also upload a final version (in PDF). The Manuscript Clearance Advisor will approve your final version, and will deliver your approved final manuscript to ProQuest in a separate step, after all manuscripts have been processed for your semester of graduation.

• You must click the “Submit Dissertation/Thesis” button at the end of the process in order to send your manuscript to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor. The manuscript will not be considered submitted for Initial Format Check until this final step has been completed.

• Your PDF should have a file name formatted in the following manner:[LastName]_[FirstInitial]_[Thesis/Treatise/Dissertation]_[Year of Graduation](e.g. Doe_J_Dissertation_2011])

• If your manuscript is over 250 MB in size,you will need to upload a two-page placeholder manuscript consisting of your Title page and a note stating that the FSU Manuscript Clearance Advisor will deliver the final, approved manuscript by FTP. You will then send your full manuscript to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor through the FSU Dropbox (dropbox.fsu.edu ).

• Once you complete the submission to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, there are certain limits to changing your options:If you want to order more copies than you originally indicated, you can do so by contacting ProQuest directly after their publishing unit has received your manuscript.

  1. If you want to subtract copies from your order (and get a refund), you can contact ProQuest directly at any time.
  2. If you want to change from Open Access Publishing to Traditional Publishing, you can contact ProQuest directly at any time.
  3. If you want to change from Traditional Publishing to Open Access Publishing, you will need to Withdraw your submission and create a new submission.

Students must upload a copy of their manuscript for formatting clearance by the published deadline and prior to the final submission. All completed and signed University forms must be submitted to the Graduate Music Office by no later than 3pm on the final submission deadline.

Letters of permission must be obtained for copyrighted materials that are to be used in theses, treatises and dissertations. These letters must accompany the dissertation/treatise when it is presented to the University.

Please note that any thesis that utilizes human subjects must have the approval of the Human Subjects Review Committee before the thesis is begun.

Doctoral Dissertation & Treatise

All doctoral programs culminate with a written document; non-performance students prepare a “dissertation,” while performance students prepare a “treatise.” NOTE: Performance majors may choose from the options below:

Option 1. An extensive Treatise research document of a minimum of 12,000 words, not including front and back matter such as title page, table of contents, lists of figures, bibliography and appendices.

Option 2. A Treatise research document based on two public lecture recitals, each lecture comprised of a minimum of 2500 words plus figures and examples. The document will comprise a minimum of 6,000 words, not including front and back matter.

**All Treatise submission requirements and University deadlines are applicable to both of the options above.**

Work on the treatise/dissertation generally does not begin until the student has completed all coursework. The major professor, in consultation with the student, decides when the student is ready to begin the prospectus (the formal proposal for a dissertation or treatise), which is usually presented to the committee at or near the preliminary exam. (Follow the format in the College of Music’s Treatise and Dissertation Handbook (available in the Graduate Music Office and online) and the Guidelines for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers (available from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in 314 Westcott and online.)

NOTE: A student must be admitted to candidacy (i.e. pass the Preliminary Exam) at least six (6) months prior to the granting of the degree. The purpose of this requirement is to ensure a minimal lapse of time for effective work on the dissertation after acquisition of the basic competence and after delineation of the problem and method of attack. More realistically, the student should expect to spend a year or more of work on the dissertation. Questions? Please contact The Graduate School: 850-644-3501.

The Prospectus for a dissertation/treatise is normally approved at least six months prior to the date of graduation and before registering for dissertation/treatise credits. The Prospectus signature page must be signed by all members of the committee, (and at least), the title and signature pages of the Prospectus must be filed in the Graduate Music Office when completed. While procedures may vary somewhat from committee to committee, the first draft of the dissertation/treatise is usually developed and written with primary supervisory responsibility from the major professor (calling on other members of the committee for assistance as needed). Only after that draft has been corrected by and meets the standards of the major professor is the preliminary draft of the completed dissertation/treatise prepared and submitted to the full committee, normally at least four weeks prior to the scheduled defense. Please consult the Graduate Music Office for these deadlines for the current semester.

The doctoral treatise (performance majors only) follows a format identical to the dissertation. The treatise, however, is normally not equivalent to the dissertation in length, as the doctoral recitals (MV_6985-89, 1-4 hours each) and the treatise collectively constitute the “dissertation” for performance majors. The purpose of the doctoral treatise in performance is to demonstrate that the candidate can perform substantive scholarly research and can present that research in proper written style.

Treatise topics should be related to the student’s general performance area, but within that broad category a wide variety of subjects is appropriate: studies related to history, literature, performance practice, bibliography, pedagogy, etc. Although an estimated average length of a treatise should not be used as a basis on which to plan a research project, a treatise of 50 to 100 pages is typical. While the treatise differs conceptually from the dissertation, the treatise must reflect equally diligent research and attention to the elements of scholarly presentation.

The student will typically enroll for a minimum of 4 hours of MUS 6979r (Treatise) prior to graduation, although this depends upon the recital credit count. In certain areas, a treatise professor (other than the major professor) may be selected to direct the treatise. In selecting a topic for the doctoral performance treatise, the candidate should work closely with the major professor to ensure that the subject can be adequately supervised by the treatise professor with resource assistance from the Supervisory Committee (Follow the format in the Guidelines for Thesis, Treatise and Dissertation Writers available from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in 314 Westcott.). The title and signature pages of the Prospectus for the treatise must be signed by all members of the committee and filed in the Graduate Music Office.

Upon completing the prospectus, the student must then pass the Preliminary/Comprehensive Exam. Students may not register for treatise/dissertation hours until this exam is passed and the Admission to Candidacy form (located in 203 HMU) has been filed with the COM Registrar. The completion of the prospectus is not enough to allow registration for treatise/dissertation hours. Once the Registrar has the Admission to Candidacy form, and not before, the student will be cleared to register for these hours.

A student who has completed the required coursework, passed the Preliminary Examination and submitted an Admission to Candidacy form to the Office of the Registrar, and continues to use campus facilities and/or receives faculty supervision, but has not been cleared by the Manuscript Clearance office shall include in the required full-time load a minimum of two credit hours of dissertation/treatise per semester, including Summer term, until completion of the degree. Doctoral students must maintain continuous dissertation/treatise enrollment and also be registered for a minimum of two hours of dissertation/treatise during the final semester.

CREDIT CONVERSION from DIS credits to Treatise/Dissertation: Students who have fulfilled all class requirements are allowed to register for DIS credits (with the DIS title, “Dissertation Research”), during the semester they register for the Preliminary Exam; MUS 8964.  These DIS credits may be converted to Treatise credits for performance majors (course # MUS 6979), or Dissertation credits for non-performance majors (course # MUS 6980), if the student passes their Preliminary Exam by the 7th week of the semester deadline (mid-October in Fall, mid-February in Spring).  The conversion process simply involves completing “Drop/Add” slips that must be signed by the Major Professor, and delivered to the FSU Registrar’s Office at the football stadium (Bldg. A, 3rd floor).  Students must obtain “Drop/Add” forms from our College of Music Registrar in room HMU 203.

The student must be registered for at least two credits of treatise/dissertation in any semester where he/she intends to utilize University faculty and resources. No exceptions.

The credit hours for MUS 6980r (Dissertation) and 6979r (Treatise) are variable, but a general formula is a work/hour ratio of 3:1. For example, an individual who plans to spend twelve hours per week working on the dissertation or treatise should register for four hours of MUS 6980r or 6979r. Doctoral students must register for a minimum of two (2) dissertation or treatise credit hours per term for every semester during which they are working on the treatise/dissertation. This includes the final term of enrollment. NO exceptions.

The student must register for Dissertation Defense (MUS 8985, 0 credit)–during the semester in which the dissertation/treatise will be defended. The defense is an oral examination that must be completed according to the deadlines published each semester.

Academic courtesy requires that the dissertation be submitted to each member of the supervisory committee at least four weeks before the date of the oral examination. The supervisory committee, the chair of the major department, and such other members of the faculty as may be appointed by the academic dean will conduct the examination. All members of the graduate faculty are invited to attend. At least two weeks prior to the date of the examination, the student or major professor will present an announcement of the dissertation title and the date and place of the examination to The Graduate School. Consult the Registration Guide for the deadline dates.

The defense of dissertation will be oral. Responsibility for suggesting the time, designating the place, and presiding at the examination rests with the major professor. It is recommended that students defend no later than the eighth week of classes in the semester of intent to graduate. Students must defend by no later than the Format Approval Deadline in the semester of intent to graduate. Consult the Graduate School for more information.

The examination must be completed at least four weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. At least one week prior to the defense, the revised, final version of the treatise/dissertation (complete with table of contents, musical examples, bibliography, and dissertation abstract) must be in the hands of each member of the committee. The abstract should conform to appropriate examples in the “Requirements for Electronic Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers”. Check with the Graduate Music Office for exact deadline dates for the current semester.

All committee members and the student must attend the entire defense in real time,either by being physically present or participating via distance technology. If exceptional emergency circumstances, e.g. medical or other emergency situations, prevent the participation of a committee member then it may be necessary to arrange for an additional appropriately qualified colleague to attend the defense. A minimum of four members with Graduate Faculty Status must participate.

The oral examining committee will certify in writing to the academic dean of the major department the results of the examination: passed, failed, or to be reexamined. The report of results following a reexamination must indicate the student either passed or failed. To receive a passing grade, the written dissertation must be in final form or require only minor revisions at the time of the defense.

A grade of PASS for the defense of treatise or dissertation requires at least a majority approval of the committee. If the student passes, each Committee member must digitally sign the appropriate manuscript clearance forms within the Clearance Portal to substantiate the results of the defense.

In scheduling your defense date, you’re encouraged to make use of an online scheduling program such as “Doodle” (www.doodle.com). This will help you in coordinating available dates and times between all of your committee members, in as efficient a manner as possible. Be sure to include at least 5 dates, with a variety of times.

The oral examining committee will certify in writing to the COM Associate Dean the results of the examination: passed, failed, or to be reexamined. The report of results following a reexamination must indicate the student either passed or failed.

A written critique of the conduct of the examination in defense of dissertation should be submitted by the University Representative (Outside Committee member) from the graduate faculty to the Graduate School through the Manuscript Clearance Portal within one week after the date of defense.  If the student defends on the final deadline for defense for a given semester, the University Representative must submit their written critique no later than 11:59PM of the final clearance deadline (i.e. the one week deadline does not apply here).

While the graduate policy stipulates that in addition to the supervisory committee, the department Chair and any other faculty appointed by the Associate Dean will conduct the dissertation defense, the department Chair may choose not to participate and the Associate Dean is not required to appoint other faculty to serve.

  • Consult with the Major Professor or the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in this regard.

After approval by the oral examining committee, the dissertation/treatise must be submitted to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor via ProQuest approximately three and a half weeks before the end of the semester (see FSU Registration Guide for exact date). The dissertation/treatise will be accessible through the University Library System. An abstract also must be submitted to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor (314 Westcott).

The University requires the dissertation or treatise to be completed within 5 years of the preliminary exam, or the student may be required to retake the preliminary exam.

**Note on Approved Language**

The typical language of the dissertation, treatise, or thesis is English. Under special circumstances the Major Professor, the Academic Unit Head and the Supervisory Committee may approve writing the body of the thesis/dissertation in a language other than English if doing so is essential for scholarly reasons. Lack of sufficient English competency is not an acceptable justification for using an alternative language. The Major Professor shall immediately notify the Dean of the College and the Dean of the Graduate School for all cases where such approval has been granted. Notification requires completion of the ETD Alternative Language for the Dissertation /Treatise/ Thesis Form. All committee members must be completely proficient in the alternative language. It is the responsibility of the Major Professor and the Supervisory Committee to ascertain that the candidate’s thesis/dissertation is written in acceptable English or an alternative language, in an appropriate scholarly style. All non-English-language dissertations, treatises, or theses must have the preliminary pages and main section headings in English. This would include the content of the title page, committee page, acknowledgments, abstract and biographical sketch. All main section headings, including chapter and appendix headings, must be in English, but chapter/appendix titles may be in the chosen language.

The defense shall be conducted in English.

60 Day Rule:

  • Please note that students MUST complete the final clearance of their manuscript within 60 days of the successful defense of their manuscript, or they MUST re-defend their manuscript. Should students have any questions about this rule, please contact The Graduate School at (850) 644-3501.

Submitting Your Manuscript:

  1. What you will need:

• Your manuscript in PDF format, with embedded fonts (information on embedding fonts can be found on the UMI ETD site)

• A credit card (if you are selecting services beyond Traditional Publishing, or ordering copies)

  1. Decisions you will make:

• You will choose between Traditional Publishing and Open Access Publishing. Traditional Publishing is free (this is a change for Fall 2011 and beyond) and Open Access Publishing costs $95.Traditional Publishing means that readers have to pay UMI (ProQuest) for access to your full work. Open Access Publishing means that your work will be available for free, in its entirety, in the ProQuest system.

• You will choose whether or not you want major search engines to find your work in the ProQuest system.

• You will choose whether or not you want to allow ProQuest to allow third party retailers to sell copies of your work.

• You will choose whether to have ProQuest make your work available immediately upon publication, or to embargo your work for two years (or permanently)

• You will choose whether or not you want ProQuest to register a copyright of your thesis/treatise/dissertation, on your behalf, with the U.S. Office of Copyright. This is an optional service costing$55.

• If desired, you will order printed copies of your thesis/treatise/dissertation from ProQuest (this is optional)

  1. Steps you will take:

• Create a Registration in the UMI ETD Administration site (www.etdadmin.com/fsu)

• Read the instructions

• Select publishing options

• Read and accept the ProQuest/UMI agreement

• Enter your contact information

• Enter information about your thesis/treatise/dissertation

• Upload your manuscript

• Select whether or not you want ProQuest to register a copyright on your thesis/treatise/dissertation

• Order copies (optional)

• Double-check your information and click”Submit Dissertation/Thesis” to send your manuscript to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor for initial format check

Please note:

• This submission is the first step in the manuscript clearance process. At a minimum, you will have to also upload a final version (in PDF). The Manuscript Clearance Advisor will approve your final version, and will deliver your approved final manuscript to ProQuest in a separate step, after all manuscripts have been processed for your semester of graduation.

• You must click the “Submit Dissertation/Thesis” button at the end of the process in order to send your manuscript to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor. The manuscript will not be considered submitted for Initial Format Check until this final step has been completed.

• Your PDF should have a file name formatted in the following manner:[LastName]_[FirstInitial]_[Thesis/Treatise/Dissertation]_[Year of Graduation](e.g. Doe_J_Dissertation_2011])

• If your manuscript is over 250 MB in size,you will need to upload a two-page placeholder manuscript consisting of your Title page and a note stating that the FSU Manuscript Clearance Advisor will deliver the final, approved manuscript by FTP. You will then send your full manuscript to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor through the FSU Dropbox (dropbox.fsu.edu ).

• Once you complete the submission to the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, there are certain limits to changing your options:If you want to order more copies than you originally indicated, you can do so by contacting ProQuest directly after their publishing unit has received your manuscript.

  1. If you want to subtract copies from your order (and get a refund), you can contact ProQuest directly at any time.
  2. If you want to change from Open Access Publishing to Traditional Publishing, you can contact ProQuest directly at any time.
  3. If you want to change from Traditional Publishing to Open Access Publishing, you will need to Withdraw your submission and create a new submission.

Letters of permission must be obtained for copyrighted materials that are to be used in theses, treatises and dissertations. These letters must accompany the dissertation/treatise when it is presented to the University.

Please note that any thesis that utilizes human subjects must have the approval of the Human Subjects Review Committee before the thesis is begun.

Letters of permission must be obtained for copyrighted materials that are to be used in theses, treatises and dissertations. These letters must accompany the thesis or dissertation/treatise when it is presented to the University. Please note that treatises or dissertations that utilize human subjects must be approved by the Human Subjects Review Committee. This includes documents that incorporate interviews which can be considered as, “oral history”.

For additional details about dissertations/treatises, see the charts at in this Handbook, the area coordinator, and the University’s “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers” (available from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in 314 Westcott).

Human Subjects Committee

Doctoral students writing a treatise or dissertation that involves human subjects (including interviews, surveys, etc.) must have their research methods approved by the Human Subjects Committee prior to beginning their research. Students who involve human subjects without the approval of the committee will most likely have their manuscripts denied clearance by the Manuscript Clearance Advisor. More details regarding the Human Subjects committee and specific procedures can be found in the “Treatise/Dissertation Handbook” published by the COM Graduate Office, and also on the FSU Office of Research website:

http://www.research.fsu.edu/humansubjects/

Style Manuals

Follow the style manual appropriate for your area of specialty. Consult the major professor for details. This information will also be covered in MUS 5711 Music Bibliography.

Publication Manual. 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association, Inc., 2001.

The Chicago Manual of Style. 16th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Guidelines and Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers. Published by Florida State University and available from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, 314 Westcott.

Irvine, Demar. Writing About Music. 3rd ed., revised by Mark A. Radice. Portland: Timber Press, 1999.

Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. 8th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013.

Treatise and Dissertation Handbook. FSU College of Music, 2003.

Master’s Recitals
FOR PERFORMANCE MAJORS ONLY

The Master’s degree in performance requires a recital (four recitals for accompanying majors), which is generally performed during the student’s last semester in residence. The recital for performance majors is the equivalent of the thesis for non-performance Master’s students. The course numbers for the recital are MV_ 5976 (Recital Prep) and MV_ 5977 (Recital) (2 hrs. each, S/U grade only). The student and advisor decide how the courses are to be distributed, that is, MV_ 5976-77 may be taken sequentially over two semesters, or MV_ 5976-77 may both be taken in one semester. The student, however, must register for MV_ 5977 in the semester in which the recital is performed. The total four hours of MV_ 5976-77 result in a single Master’s Recital. (Voice performance and accompanying majors should consult their respective coordinators for a slightly different recital registration procedure.)

A recital examination is required ten to fourteen days in advance of the recital itself, and an application for the examination and the recital must be made in the recital hall scheduling office (HMU 112) the first week of the semester in which you plan to give the recital. Because of the great number of scheduled recitals, early scheduling is encouraged in order to ensure a space. Very specific recital guidelines can be obtained from the recital hall scheduling office. Please call for more information: 644-2705.

In scheduling recitals, the student must observe the following procedures:

1) For more information about scheduling your recital, please call 644-2705.

  • Schedule date for examination, rehearsal times, and recital in HMU 112.
  • Return endorsed forms to 202D HMU.
  •  Fill out Equipment Form.
  • Submit typed copy of program to Public Relations (213 HMU) at least seven business days prior to the concert date.
  • Check program proof at 213 HMU.
  • Recital Cancellation – The student must present this to HMU 112 in the event the Recital is canceled OR postponed.

2) Recital Examination – Provide at least five typed copies of recital program.

At the recital examination the area coordinator or major professor is in charge. The recital examination is normally attended by the area faculty, Supervisory Committee, and any member of the Graduate Faculty who wishes to attend. A 2/3 positive majority by the Supervisory Committee and the area faculty or area recital examination and audition committee constitutes a “pass,” except in the voice area, which requires a 3/4 positive vote of the attending faculty. If the student does not pass the recital examination, the recital must be canceled (notify HMU 112). Then, the Supervisory Committee will decide if and when another examination is to be given.

If the student passes the examination but does not pass the recital (as judged by the Supervisory Committee), the major professor will notify the Graduate Music Office and consult with the student’s Supervisory Committee and area faculty to determine a course of action. A simple majority vote is required to pass the recital.

When the Master’s recital is performed successfully (as judged by the student’s Supervisory Committee), the Master’ Final Recital Form is completed and signed by the supervisory committee and forwarded (with the recital program) to the Graduate Office immediately following the recital. A grade cannot be awarded for a recital without a completed recital form on file.

Accompanying Majors Please Note:

Recital exams of accompanying majors are to be heard and voted on by accompanying faculty members. Solo faculty members are no longer required to hear these exams.

Doctoral Recitals
FOR PERFORMANCE MAJORS ONLY

Doctoral recitals, MV_ 6985-9 (1-4 hours each, S/U grade only–see FSU Bulletin for descriptions), are performed at various stages during the student’s course of studies in the DM Performance program. The student and the major professor decide when recitals are to be given. Usually, only one recital is performed each semester, and recitals may be presented out of numerical sequence. Detailed recital requirements for each degree program are included in the program of study for the degree, which is available in the Graduate Music Office, and in the charts found near the end of this Handbook.

For most performance areas a recital examination is required 10-14 days in advance of the recital itself, and an application for the examination and the recital must be made in the recital hall scheduling office (HMU 112) the first week of the semester in which you plan to give the recital. Because of the great number of recitals each semester, early scheduling is encouraged in order to ensure a space. The faculty advisor must approve the recital reservation. Then, the student must observe the procedures cited under MASTER’S RECITALS.

Students should schedule recitals in consultation with their supervisory committee so that all members of their committee can attend.

For more information about scheduling your recital, please call the recital hall scheduling office at 644-2705.

If the student does not pass the examination, the recital must be canceled (notify HMU 112). Then, the supervisory committee will decide if and when another examination is to be given.

If the student passes the examination but does not pass the recital (as judged by the supervisory committee), the major professor will notify the Graduate Music Office and consult with the student’s supervisory committee and area faculty to determine a course of action.

When the Doctoral recital is performed successfully (as judged by the student’s supervisory committee), the “Doctoral Recital Form” is completed and signed by the supervisory committee and forwarded (with the recital program) to the Graduate Music Office immediately following the recital. A grade cannot be awarded for a recital without a completed recital form on file. Definition of a voting quorum will be determined by the applied faculty in each area. There are variations in the procedures described above, depending upon the particular area. For greater detail, see the area coordinator and the charts found near the end of this Handbook.

Final Term of Coursework

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Doctoral Preliminary Examination

The Doctoral Preliminary Examination consists of written and oral sections and is taken when the student has completed all course work or in the final semester of coursework. It is the responsibility of the student’s major professor to determine when a student must take the examination. The student must be registered for MUS 8964 (0 credit) during the semester in which the examination is taken.

Doctoral students must complete all requirements for the Ph.D. degree within five years of passing the Preliminary Examination (but at least six months after passing the prelims).

  1. Elapsed time for the treatise generally is determined by the student’s Supervisory Committee.

In scheduling your Preliminary Exam defense date, you’re encouraged to make use of an online scheduling program such as “Doodle” (www.doodle.com). This will help you in coordinating available dates and times between all of your committee members, in as efficient a manner as possible. Be sure to include at least 5 dates, with a variety of times.

The University Representative, or “Outside Committee Member”, does not need to be present at the Preliminary Exam Defense. However, it is entirely at the discretion of the student’s Major Professor, or Committee Chair, to decide what they feel is appropriate in this case. I.E. – A student will typically receive an exam question from each Committee Member. If the University Representative is not available to participate in the Preliminary Exam Defense, the student may receive one less question. The Committee Chair/Area Coordinator determines the number of questions their student is to receive.

**In the Brass, Woodwinds, and Percussion area, it is important to note that 4 questions will be given to the student. Questions? Please consult the Area Coordinator.

**It is important to remember that all Committee members, including the University Representative, MUST be present (either physically or via distance technology) at the Defense of the Treatise or Dissertation…No exceptions.

Satisfactory completion of a preliminary examination shall be required for admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree. No student may register for dissertation or doctoral treatise hours prior to the point in the semester in which the preliminary examination was passed. An admission to candidacy form must be completed and filed in the Office of the University Registrar prior to registration for dissertation/treatise hours. After completion of the admission to candidacy process, the student may change DIS credits to treatise or dissertation hours for that semester in which the preliminary examination was completed.

NOTE: A student must be admitted to candidacy (i.e. pass the Preliminary Exam) at least six (6) months prior to the granting of the degree. The purpose of this requirement is to ensure a minimal lapse of time for effective work on the dissertation after acquisition of the basic competence and after delineation of the problem and method of attack. More realistically, the student should expect to spend a year or more of work on the dissertation. Questions? Please contact The Graduate School: 850-644-3501.

A student who has completed the required coursework, passed the Preliminary Examination and submitted an Admission to Candidacy form to the Office of the Registrar, and continues to use campus facilities and/or receives faculty supervision, but has not been cleared by the Manuscript Clearance office shall include in the required full-time load a minimum of two credit hours of dissertation/treatise per semester, including Summer term, until completion of the degree. Doctoral students must maintain continuous dissertation/treatise enrollment and also be registered for a minimum of two hours of dissertation/treatise during the final semester.

Credit conversion from DIS to Treatise or Dissertation hours is only permitted if the preliminary examination is passed by the end of the seventh week of the semester. Please refer to the FSU Academic Calendar, found on the FSU Registrar’s website, for the deadline.

If the student fails all or part of the preliminary examination before being admitted to candidacy, a re-examination may be offered by the student’s supervisory committee or other relevant decision making body within each department or unit, per that department or unit’s doctoral student handbook. The Academic Dean’s office should be notified of the outcome of any preliminary exam attempt.

Students can take the preliminary examination for admission to candidacy only two times. A second failure on the preliminary exam makes the student ineligible to continue in the degree program. The second attempt at the preliminary exam shall occur no sooner than six full class weeks after the results of the first attempt are shared with the student. For the purpose of this policy, a “full class week” is defined as a week with five days during which classes are held at FSU. Students must be registered separately for their first and second attempt, if necessary within the same semester, and must receive either a “pass” or a “fail” grade for each attempt.

An exception request regarding the timing of the re-examination can be submitted for consideration to the Academic Dean’s Office by either the student or the supervisory committee. Students who allege that academic regulations and/or procedures were improperly applied for the re-examination of their preliminary exam may have their grievances addressed through the general academic appeals process.

Because the procedures of this examination vary slightly among degree programs, specific information regarding the procedures and content of the preliminary examination can be obtained from the Coordinator of the particular area and the charts found near the end of this Handbook.

String Area Policies:

For the doctoral preliminary exam in strings the student will submit a completed treatise prospectus, complete at least one comprehensive exam question, and will schedule an oral defense of the exam components with the doctoral committee. The major professor must approve the prospectus prior to submission to the committee and will determine the content of the comprehensive question (s). The student will have seven days to complete the written response to the comprehensive portion of the exam and must submit the response and prospectus to the committee members at least two weeks prior to the oral defense.

Master’s Comprehensive

General Guidelines For Non-thesis Degrees(MUS 8966):

For non-thesis degree programs, the Master’s Comprehensive Exam consists of both written and oral sections and is taken during the student’s last semester in residence. The student must be registered for MUS 8966 (0 credit) during the semester in which the exam is taken.

In scheduling your Master’s Comprehensive date, you’re encouraged to make use of an online scheduling program such as “Doodle” (http://www.doodle.com). This will help you in coordinating available dates and times between all of your committee members, in as efficient a manner as possible. Be sure to include at least 5 dates, with a variety of times.

  1. These exams usually include some questions from the major field of study and some that are more comprehensive in nature (history, theory, style, analysis, literature, etc.). Please consult the area coordinator for more specific information.

If the student fails all or part of the comprehensive exam, the committee has the option of dismissing the student from the program or requiring the student to retake all or part of the exam at a later date. If the student fails this second exam, dismissal from the program will result. A grade of “P” or “F” must be recorded for each exam attempt.  “Incomplete” grades are not permitted for any graduate-level exam or defense courses.  If the exam requirements are not completed, the student should be advised to drop MUS 8966 from their schedule and re-enroll in MUS 8966 during a subsequent term.  Students are required to enroll in the Master’s Comprehensive Exam course (MUS 8966) during the semester that the exam is completed, and must be enrolled for each attempt.

Guidelines For MM, Piano Performance Majors (Effective August, 2021):

  1. Essays

You will be presented with essay questions provided by your Masters Committee, one from each member.  You will have one week to complete a total of three (3) essays* without help from the Committee or the Major Advisor.  Your completed essays are to be submitted at the end of that session either electronically or collated hard copy, as preferred by each committee member.

These essays must be well-written, well-researched, and presented in a consistent, standard research format such as Chicago, APA or Turabian.  They should demonstrate a capacity for independent and creative thinking, and the ability to present, develop, and support a point of view, to allow the committee to evaluate your written and verbal readiness for scholarly work.

You are expected to observe the Code of Academic Honor as stated on the FSU College of Music website with regards to the originality of your work and citing of sources.  You may not reproduce other people’s work which you may have acquired during classes you have taken.  Faculty may not assist once you have been assigned the topics for your essays.

  1. Oral examination

At the oral examination, your committee will ask you to discuss a variety of questions as they see fit.  This will include follow-up questions on your essays, and also may include new topics that would allow you to demonstrate your readiness for further graduate study or other professional work in the field.

Sequence of events:

  1. Check time and date with your committee for your oral exam (this will take place at least

two weeks after the essays have been assigned) and book a space for a two-hour block.

It is recommended that you use an online calendar service such as doodle.com to coordinate all schedules involved.

  1. Receive your essay topics and completion deadline from your major professor.
  2. Write your essays; submit them by the specified deadline to all committee members in

the form of their choosing – on paper, or electronically.

  1. Complete your oral exam, which should take place 7-10 days after submission of the

completed essays.

*MM, Piano Performance students admitted prior to Fall 2021 may opt for the former requirement of two (2) essays total.

Guidelines For MM, Voice Performance Majors:

1) During the first semester of Recital and Repertoire Coaching, the student will research and write program notes on the recital repertoire.

Guidelines for Writing Program Notes for the Recital Repertoire

The notes must reflect thorough research. The content should include factual information about:

The historical period of the composition and perhaps the date of the composition (where it fits into the composer’s complete works; a sense of the work’s history).

A brief summary of the composer’s biography that is directly relevant to the understanding of the music (factual information that is NOT relevant to the piece itself should be omitted).

Some basic information about the poet (e.g. poet’s dates, when the poem was written, for whom, etc.).

Give the audience a sense of what to expect while hearing the piece:

Information on the form, style, sound, effect and feeling of the music.

Analytical facts that cannot be heard or that do not contribute to the point of the discussion should NOT be included.

Select one or two points to make and make it clear how every statement relates to the point being made.

Move from the general to the specific: information on the composer and history of the piece, then work toward the nature of the piece itself.

Writing style:

The writing style should be readable, appealing, and in grammatically perfect English.

Stilted, poetic or metaphorical style, colloquialisms, and technical jargon should be AVOIDED.

Should be interesting.

The notes should engage the reader and draw them into the music.

There is not much time for an audience member to read and understand the program notes. So be sure that your language is succinct and clear.

Plagiarism:

Credit must be given for ideas that are taken from sources discovered in the process of research. Citations should be written in an informal manner in the text of the program notes, rather than using footnotes. You may take the information you have gleaned and put it into your own words.

Proof-reading:

Your notes should be proof-read multiple times by several different people. Do not rely on your own proof-reading. Someone else will see things you may have missed.

A week before the last day of classes of the semester, this document must be handed in to all members of the student’s supervisory committee in hard copy form.
If the repertoire for the recital is changed once the program notes have been submitted to the supervisory committee, the new repertoire must be approved by the supervisory committee and an addendum to the program notes will be required. The supervisory committee will be notified immediately if there is any change in the recital repertoire and will set up a deadline for the student’s submission to the committee of the addendum to the program notes.

Comprehensive examination: The program notes will be used as part of the comprehensive examination the following semester.

2) During the final semester (normally the fourth semester of study) the student must take a translation examination, most likely on a designated Wednesday afternoon. The student chooses one of three languages (French, German, or Italian) and will have one hour to complete the translation into English. The student may use a dictionary and verb book but no grammar book for this process. These translations will become part of the student’s comprehensive examination. Copies of the student’s translation exam will be sent to the major professor by the voice coordinator (or the monitor of the exam) who, in turn, must send copies to the members of the supervisory committee immediately upon receiving the translation.

3) The oral portion of the Comprehensive Examination should take place soon after the recital. This exam consists of a defense of the program notes and the translation including an oral reading of the foreign language passage that was translated. Based on the Program of Studies Form the exam shall include a comprehensive review of the student’s work at FSU which may include questions, terms, names, and/or score identification. It may also include a discussion of the student’s recital performance.

Thesis Degrees (MUS 8976)

For thesis degree programs, the student’s oral exam usually consists of thesis defense only, and the student must register for MUS 8976 (0 credit). The MM Composition, MM Musicology, and MM Theory degrees, however, also require a written comprehensive exam. These exams usually include some questions from the major field of study and some that are more comprehensive in nature (history, theory, style, analysis, literature, etc.). Please consult the area coordinator for specific information.

In scheduling your Master’s Comprehensive date, you’re encouraged to make use of an online scheduling program such as “Doodle” (www.doodle.com). This will help you in coordinating available dates and times between all of your committee members, in as efficient a manner as possible. Be sure to include at least 5 dates, with a variety of times.

If the student fails all or part of the exam, the committee has the option of dismissing the student from the program or requiring the student to retake all or part of the exam at a later date. If the student fails this second exam, dismissal from the program will result.  A grade of “P” or “F” must be recorded for each exam attempt.  “Incomplete” grades are not permitted for any graduate-level exam or defense courses.  If the defense is not completed, the student should be advised to drop MUS 8976 from their schedule and re-enroll in MUS 8976 during a subsequent term.  Students are required to enroll in the Master’s Thesis Defense course (MUS 8976) during the semester that the defense is conducted, and for each attempt.

Semester of Graduation

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General

The most comprehensive source of information on procedures for the final semester is the Steps to Graduation handout available in the College of Music Graduate Office. What follows is a summary of the more important points.

Graduation does NOT occur automatically; you must apply for it. Students planning to graduate must apply for graduation through the University Registrar’s Office. Please adhere to the graduation application deadlines found on the Registrar’s Academic Calendar. Master’s thesis and all doctoral candidates should follow the manuscript clearance formatting and submission policies and adhere to the semester’s pre-defense format review and post-defense (final) deadlines. (These deadlines can be obtained from the Graduate Music Office.)  All other forms required for the degree clearance may be obtained online through the College of Music website, as-well-as through the University Graduate School’s website.

As the thesis/dissertation/treatise student approaches the completion of the final project, certain informational forms need to be submitted to The Graduate School prior to the defense. These include a form advertising the time and location of defense, and a list of the student’s committee (see the University’s “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise and Dissertation Writers” for details).

The University requires that all students writing a Thesis, Treatise, or Dissertation register for a minimum of two (2) Thesis, Treatise, or Dissertation hours every Fall and Spring term until the degree is completed. This policy also applies to the final semester in which the degree is granted. There is no exception to this University requirement.

In order to graduate in a given semester and not be liable for minimum registration requirements in the following semester, students must meet the established ETD submission deadlines. No exceptions. Please contact the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in The Graduate School for clarification: (850) 644-3501.

Please be certain to register for the appropriate course (MUS 8966, 8966, or 8985) during the final semester.

Masters Degrees

MA Arts Administration

Candidates should check with the Graduate Music Office to be sure their file is complete before they leave the campus. The following items must be on file for degree clearance:

Program of Studies form, including remediation of GMCE deficiencies

Master’s Supervisory Committee Form

Master’s Exam Form showing Comprehensive Exam (MUS 8966) passed

MME, MM Therapy

NON-THESIS PROGRAM

Candidates should check with the Graduate Music Office to be sure their file is complete before they leave the campus. The following items must be on file for degree clearance:

Program of Studies form, including remediation of GMCE deficiencies

Master’s Supervisory Committee Form

Master’s Exam Form showing Comprehensive Exam (MUS 8966) passed

THESIS PROGRAM

Candidates for this degree must consult the “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers”, which may be obtained from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in The Graduate School in 314 Westcott: (850) 644-3501.

The following items must be on file in the Graduate Music Office before final clearance will be granted:

  1. “Program of Studies” form
  2. “Master’s Supervisory Committee Form”
  3. “Master’s Exam Form” showing Defense (MUS 8976) passed
  4. University manuscript clearance forms – with appropriate signatures
  5. Please check with the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, as there may be additional paperwork or procedures.

MM Theory, Composition, Musicology

Candidates for these degrees must consult the “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers”, which may be obtained from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in The Graduate School in 314 Westcott: (850) 644-3501.

The following items must be on file in the Graduate Music Office before final clearance will be granted:

  1. “Program of Studies” form
  2. “Master’s Supervisory Committee Form”
  3. “Master’s Exam Form” showing Thesis Defense (MUS 8976) and Comprehensive Exam (MUS 8966) passed
  4. University manuscript clearance forms – with appropriate signatures
  5. Please check with the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, as there may be additional paperwork or procedures.

MM Performance

Candidates for this degree must complete the following before clearance will be granted:

  1. “Program of Studies” form
  2. “Master’s Supervisory Committee Form”
  3. “Master’s Exam & Recital Form” showing Comprehensive Exam (MUS 8966) and recital(s) passed
Doctoral Degrees

PHD Musicology, Theory, Education

Candidates for this degree must consult the “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers”, which may be obtained from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in The Graduate School in 314 Westcott: (850) 644-3501.

The following items must be completed and on file in the Graduate Music Office before degree clearance will be granted:

  1. “Program of Studies” form
  2. “Doctoral Supervisory Committee Form”
  3. “Doctoral Exam Form” showing Diagnostic/Preliminary Exam (MUS 8964) and Dissertation Defense (MUS 8985) passed
  4. Prospectus signature page
  5. University manuscript clearance forms – with appropriate signatures
  6. Please check with the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, as there may be additional paperwork or procedures.

Specific questions regarding dissertation format not outlined in the Guidelines booklet should be addressed to the major professor and/or the Manuscript Clearance Advisor (314 Westcott).

DM Composition

Candidates for this degree must consult the “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers”, which may be obtained from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in The Graduate School in 314 Westcott: (850) 644-3501.

The following items must be completed and on file in the Graduate Music Office before degree clearance will be granted:

  1. “Program of Studies” form
  2. “Doctoral Supervisory Committee Form”
  3. “Doctoral Exam Form” showing Diagnostic Exam, Preliminary Exam, and Composition Defense passed
  4. University manuscript clearance forms – with appropriate signatures
  5. Please check with the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, as there may be additional paperwork or procedures.

DM Performance

Candidates for this degree must consult the “Requirements for Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers”, which may be obtained from the Manuscript Clearance Advisor in The Graduate School in 314 Westcott: (850) 644-3501.

The following items must be completed and on file in the Graduate Music Office before degree clearance will be granted:

  1. “Program of Studies” form
  2. “Doctoral Supervisory Committee Form”
  3. “Doctoral Exam Form” showing Diagnostic, Preliminary Exams and Treatise Defense passed
  4. “Doctoral Recital Forms”
  5. University manuscript clearance forms – with appropriate signatures
  6. Please check with the Manuscript Clearance Advisor, as there may be additional paperwork or procedures.