Thursday, January 7, 2021

Musicology Area Continues to Shine

In 2020 the Musicology area faculty continued sharing their impressive research with an international audience.  Historical musicology and ethnomusicology inquiry, a hallmark of the program that informs faculty and student research, was again recognized at the highest levels of the profession.

Sarah Eyerly has won three prizes for two of her articles. Her article “Mozart and the Moravians” in the May 2019 Oxford journal Early Music was awarded the Marjorie Weston Emerson Award by the Mozart Society of America.  Dr. Eyerly’s co-authored article and digital project “Singing Box 331: Re-Sounding Eighteenth-Century Mohican Hymns from the Moravian Archives” that appeared in The William and Mary Quarterly (October 2019) received the Lester J. Cappon Award by the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture and the Robert F. Heizer Award by the American Society for Ethnohistory.  You can view this interactive project online here: https://oieahc.wm.edu/digital-projects/oi-reader/singing-box-331-rachel-wheeler-sarah-eyerly/.

 

Frank Gunderson received Honorable Mentions from the Alan Merriam prize committee of the Society for Ethnomusicology, and the Best Book Prize committee of the International Council for Traditional Music for his 2018 book The Legacy of Tanzanian Musicians Muhidin Gurumo and Hassan Bitchuka: Rhumba Kiserebuka!.

 

Panayotis (Paddy) League’s article “Grooving Heavy, Dancing Drunk: Gustemic Metaphor and Mimetic Polytemporality in Anatolian Greek Music” that appeared in the Fall 2019 Ethnomusicology received two awards: the first, honorable mention for the Jaap Kunst Award, acknowledging the most significant article written by a member of the Society for Ethnomusicology during the first ten years of their scholarly career, and also the Joann Kealiinohomoku Prize from the Dance, Movement and Gender Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology, which recognizes an outstanding piece of ethnomusicological work that substantially engages the topics of dance, movement, and/or gesture.

 

Douglass Seaton’s essay “Teaching Based ‘Off Of’ the Canon” formed a chapter in the collection The Norton Guide to Teaching Music History that won the 2020 Teaching Award from the American Musicological Society as “an exceptional pedagogical resource.” 

 

 

 

 

 

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